UK Earthquake Tracker - Earthquakes around the British Isles in the last 50 days

Some people think that the UK has no Earthquakes, but this isn't true...In the last 50 days we have seen the following activity:


Epicenter NearMagnitudeDistance to
Epicenter
Local TimeLink to
Map
NORWEGIAN COAST 3.7 651 mi (1047 km) 07/11/2017 08:46 Map
TARBERT,ARGYLL & BUTE 2.6 414 mi (666 km) 01/11/2017 20:59 Map
ABERYSTWYTH,CEREDIGION 0.8 227 mi (365 km) 31/10/2017 20:50 Map
RANNOCH,PERTH/KINROSS 1.1 432 mi (696 km) 31/10/2017 15:56 Map
HEXHAM,NORTHUMBERLAND 1.2 288 mi (463 km) 30/10/2017 20:41 Map
RANNOCH,PERTH/KINROSS 1.2 430 mi (692 km) 29/10/2017 23:02 Map
RANNOCH,PERTH/KINROSS 0.6 430 mi (692 km) 29/10/2017 23:02 Map
CARNACH,HIGHLAND 0.4 523 mi (842 km) 26/10/2017 23:45 Map
NEW GALLOWAY,D & G 0.2 340 mi (547 km) 23/10/2017 02:30 Map
ELLASTONE,STAFFORDSHIRE 1.6 169 mi (273 km) 22/10/2017 02:05 Map
BIRKENHEAD,MERSEYSIDE 1.4 223 mi (359 km) 20/10/2017 10:14 Map
LLANDWROG,GWYNEDD 0.8 260 mi (418 km) 18/10/2017 05:21 Map
MOIDART,HIGHLAND 0.7 473 mi (761 km) 15/10/2017 14:24 Map
GOVILON,MONMOUTHSHIRE 1.0 180 mi (289 km) 13/10/2017 11:15 Map
KINTYRE,ARGYLL & BUTE 1.0 405 mi (653 km) 12/10/2017 13:32 Map
WORTH MATRAVERS,DORSET 1.9 142 mi (228 km) 09/10/2017 18:36 Map
OBAN,ARGYLL & BUTE 1.4 441 mi (710 km) 08/10/2017 23:55 Map
ARNSIDE,CUMBRIA 1.2 259 mi (418 km) 05/10/2017 18:58 Map
DURNESS,HIGHLAND 0.9 550 mi (885 km) 05/10/2017 14:33 Map
ETTRICKBRIDGE,BORDERS 0.9 338 mi (544 km) 29/09/2017 19:42 Map
CHURCH STRETTON,SALOP 0.5 188 mi (303 km) 29/09/2017 00:21 Map
GLENELG,HIGHLAND 0.7 490 mi (788 km) 28/09/2017 23:18 Map
PENCOMBE,HEREFORDSHIRE 0.5 166 mi (267 km) 28/09/2017 02:00 Map

23 UK Earthquakes in the last 50 days.

Reproduced with the permission of the British Geological Survey © NERC. All rights Reserved.

 


And if you are not sure what the magnitude or Richter scale means then read on....

The Richter Scale

The Richter magnitude scale was developed in 1935 by Charles F. Richter of the California Institute of Technology as a mathematical device to compare the size of earthquakes. The magnitude of an earthquake is determined from the logarithm of the amplitude of waves recorded by seismographs. Adjustments are included for the variation in the distance between the various seismographs and the epicentre of the earthquakes.

On the Richter Scale, magnitude is expressed in whole numbers and decimal fractions. For example, a magnitude 5.3 might be computed for a moderate earthquake, and a strong earthquake might be rated as magnitude 6.3. Because of the logarithmic basis of the scale, each whole number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase in measured amplitude; as an estimate of energy, each whole number step in the magnitude scale corresponds to the release of about 31 times more energy than the amount associated with the preceding whole number value.

To put this into more laymens terms, the various Richter numbers can also be thought of a scale ranging from I to XII (known as the Mercalli) by which people judge the size of an earthquake based on the observed damage, and effects felt or seen during the quake:

Richter Scale